How to: Shrink/Reclaim free virtual disk space from Virtual Machines on Proxmox VE (PVE) (Windows/Linux/Debian/Ubuntu/Kali Linux/RHEL/CentOS/Fedora etc.)

Pre-requirements

Following method only works for virtual machines (VM) that are satisfying these pre-requirements:

  • Thin-provisioned backing storage (qcow2 disk, thin-lvm, zfs, …)
  • Virtio-SCSI controller configured on guest.
  • Guest scsi disks with the discard option enabled [1]

Note: While changing provisioning types and Virtio-SCSI driver are not easy with existing virtual machines, but changing VM scsi disk’s discard options is simple, that means, if we appear to have an existing VM that is using thin-provisioned backing storage and Virtio-SCSI but “discard” options is not enabled/checked, we can simply find that VM and check that option, then we are good to follow the reset of this guide.

The Issue

When we are using qcow2 sparse virtual disks, we can reclaim free disk spaces which are not using by the virtual machine. How to trigger the VM/guest operating system to reclaim it for us though?

The Fix

1 Login to Proxmox VE web gui

2 Find the VM we want to reclaim the unused disk space for and click on it

3 Click on Hardware

4 Double click on the virtual hard’s virtual hard drive we want to reclaim unused space for

5 Make sure the “Discard” is checked

Proxmox VE - Discard option
Proxmox VE – Discard option

6 Start the VM

Once the VM is fully booted

6a For Linux/Debian/Ubuntu/Kali Linux/CentOS/RHEL/Fedora etc.

6a.1 We use following command to reclaim the unused disk space from a terminal

sudo fstrim -av

Once it’s done, we should be able to see the reclaimed disk space from Proxmox VE host (Only if there is unused space, if there is no unused space, we will not see any changes from Proxmox VE host’s disk space)

6a.2 We can also enable the automatic fstrim from the VM, so we do not need to do it manually everytime. Use following command to enable this feature

sudo systemctl enable fstrim.timer

6b For Windows

Usually the trim is enabled by default on Windows (Windows 7/2008R2 and up), we should not need to modify anything.

We can check if TRIM is enabled or not by using following command

fsutil behavior query DisableDeleteNotify

The output should be 0, otherwise, we can set it manually

fsutil behavior set DisableDeleteNotify 0

We can also trigger it manually, here is how.

First, we need to shutdown the Windows VM.

Then from the Proxmox VE web gui, find the Windows VM, Navigate to “Hardware”, double click on the virtual hard drive that we want to reclaim unused space from, make sure the “Discard” and “SSD emulation” are both checked, now start the Windows VM

Proxmox VE - Discard and SSD emulation checked
Proxmox VE – Discard and SSD emulation checked

When the Windows booted, we type “defrag” in start menu to search for “Defragment and Optimize Drives” program.

Windows 10 - Defragment and Optimize Drives
Windows 10 – Defragment and Optimize Drives

Click on it to launch it, then select the drive which we want to claim unused space from, click on “Optimize” button.

We now have manually reclaimed unused space from Windows VM

References

[1] “Shrink Qcow2 Disk Files – Proxmox VE”, Pve.proxmox.com, 2019. [Online]. Available: https://pve.proxmox.com/wiki/Shrink_Qcow2_Disk_Files


How to: Find/Show/List hidden directories/folders from Linux/Unix/Debian/Ubuntu/Kali Linux/RHEL/CentOS etc.

1 For System with Graphical User Interface (GUI) (Usually means we boot into an interface where we can see and use cursor)

1.1 Open the “Files” program (Like File Explorer in Windows)

1.2 For most of Linux distros use Ctrl + H key combination to show all hidden files and folders/directories (Use Ctrl + H again to hide them)

CentOS - File, showing hidden files and folders, directories
CentOS – File, showing hidden files and folders, directories

(In Linux folders and Files begin with the dot “.” hence the dotfile/dot file are hidden)

2 For Terminal

List all files and folders/directories (Including non-hidden and hidden)

ls -ahlp
Terminal - Showing all files and folders, directories (including non-hidden and hidden)
Terminal – Showing all files and folders, directories (including non-hidden and hidden)

-a: do not ignore entries starting with the dot “.”
-h: with -l and -s, print sizes like 1K 234M 2G etc.
-l: use a long listing format
-p: append / indicator to directories

List only hidden files

ls -ap | grep -v / | grep "^."
ls -ap | grep -v / | egrep "^."

-v: select non-matching lines
-v /: Inverse match everything with a slash “/”, so that only files are shwon

^. : Anything start with the dot “.”

Terminal - Show all hidden files
Terminal – Show all hidden files

List only hidden folders/directories

ls -ap | grep "^\..*/$"
ls -ap | egrep "^\..*/$"
Terminal - Showing all hidden folders, directories
Terminal – Showing all hidden folders, directories

List only hidden folders/directories without showing “./” and “../”

ls -Ap | grep "^\..*/$"
ls -Ap | egrep "^\..*/$"
Terminal - Showing only hidden folders, directories without anything else
Terminal – Showing only hidden folders, directories without anything else

Bonus

grep (Global Regular Expressions Print) and egrep (Extended Global Regular Expressions Print) have same function but different ways to interpret regular expression patterns.


How to: Find real path of symbolic links in Debian/Ubuntu etc.

e.g. The symbolic link is “/tmp/a.sh” which pointing to the real file “/tmp/test.sh”

1 Launch terminal or connect via SSH

2 Use following command we can see all symbolic links within a directory

ls -ahl /tmp | grep "\->"

Output

lrwxrwxrwx 1 [user] [group] [date] [time] a.sh -> test.sh

3 Alternatively we can use following command to check against single link file

readlink /tmp/a.sh

Output

test.sh

Want to know how to create symbolic/soft links and hard links?

Follow this guide: Quick Linux File Manipulation Commands Reference (and How to: Create Symbolic link/Soft link/Hard link)


How to: Delete/Remove/Clear LVM volume

Warning: Proceed with extreme care, you can destroy your data easily with following commands

Can be used in Linux/Debian/Ubuntu/Kali Linux/CentOS/RHEL/Fedora/Proxmox (PVE) etc.

In this guide we assume the mount point is datamount

1 Delete entry from /etc/fstab with your favourite text editor

sudo nano /etc/fstab
# For nano, when done, Ctrl + X, Y Enter to save and exit

2 Unmount the mount point

umount /datamount
or
umount name
or
umount pve-OLD-xxxxx

3 Disable LVM

lvchange -an /dev/vg/lv
or
lvchange -an name
or
lvchange -an pve-OLD-xxxxx

4 Delete LVM volume

lvremove /dev/vg/lv
or
lvremove name
or
lvremove pve-OLD-xxxxx

5 Disable volume group

vgchange -an vg
or
vgchange -an name
or
vgchange -an pve-OLD-xxxxx

6 Delete volume group

vgremove vg
or
vgremove name
or
vgremove pve-OLD-xxxxx

7 Delete physical volumes used for volume group “vg”

pvremove /dev/sdc /dev/sdd

How to: Resolve “OMV\HttpErrorException: Invalid User-Agent” Error for OpenMediaVault (OMV)

The Error

Sometimes we will encounter following error from OMV web , especially after package update/upgrade, or after OMV-Extra installation.

Error #0:
OMV\HttpErrorException: Invalid User-Agent. in /usr/share/php/openmediavault/session.inc:198
Stack trace:
#0 /usr/share/php/openmediavault/session.inc(208): OMV\Session->validateUserAgent()
#1 /var/www/openmediavault/index.php(34): OMV\Session->validate()
#2 {main}

To Resolve

1 It’s actually very simple, all we need to do is give it a bit time, wait 10 seconds.

2 Refresh the page from browser

3 If still doesn’t work, close the browser and try open the OMV web UI again.

4 Last thing we can try is to restart the OMV

Note: Usually, the above steps will get us back to the web UI again, if we haven’t done something horribly wrong.


How to: Install docker on OpenMediaVault 5 (OMV5) easily & How to: Configure docker (Docker Storage) to use specific location to store files/container/images other than default location easily

Intro

By default, OMV-Extra use “/var/lib/docker” for docker storage, which is used for Docker images and containers storage, which is not desired if we have other storage location defined on OMV, e.g. our data drive/partition/mount point, here we will configure a specific location on data drive for Docker storage.

Background

In this guide, we have a software RAID 10 with 4 hard drives configured simply by using OMV web gui.

RAID 10 on OMV 5
RAID 10 on OMV 5

We have also created a file system on the RAID for data storage with Label “FSonRAID”

FSonRAID
FSonRAID

Preparation

1 Install OMV-Extras: How to: Install omv-extras for Open Media Vault (OMV)

2 Make sure OMV-Extras is install correctly

3 Make sure we have created file system for storage purpose correctly

4 Make sure OMV is up to date, login to OMV webui, under “System”, click on “Update Management”, Update all items if there is any

OMV5 - Update system
OMV5 – Update system

5 Login to OMV terminal or via SSH (Usually the system has a different username and password from Web GUI.)

Use following command to confirm the mount point

ls -ahl /srv

We will see a folder with name of “dev-disk-by-label-FSonRAID” (The full path is “/srv/dev-disk-by-label-FSonRAID”), in your case, if you have created the file system with other Label name e.g. MyFileSystem, it will be “dev-disk-by-label-MyFileSystem”

There are two different methods to create a dedicated folder for docker to use.

The first method is suggested for security reasons, for maximum convenience we can use the second method, it will be easier to mess up docker and less secure though, unless you have configured the folder permission correctly.

2 Method 1 – Dedicate folder

For this method we can continue from the above steps

2.1 Think of a folder name for docker storage, here we use “docker”, make sure the file system we want to use is the right one with correct label, here it is “dev-disk-by-label-FSonRAID”, thus the full path will be “/srv/dev-disk-by-label-FSonRAID/docker” in this example (Note: If you have other folders under the file system, use following command to double check, make sure use a non-existing name for the new folder for docker storage!)

ls -ahld /srv/dev-disk-by-label-FSonRAID/*

2.2 Navigate to “System – OMV-Extras”

2.3 Click on “Docker”

Enter desired full path for “Docker Storage”, here we use “/srv/dev-disk-by-label-FSonRAID/docker”, click on “Save” button to save the path

Configure path for docker on OMV5
Configure path for docker on OMV5

2.4 Now click on “Docker” button, then click on “Install” to Install Docker (Docker can also be installed manually via terminal/SSH, here we take easier approach)

OMV 5 Install Docker
OMV 5 Install Docker

2.5 Once done, the folder “/srv/dev-disk-by-label-FSonRAID/docker” will be created

Also, following folders will be created

Folders in docker folder
Folders in docker folder

Now we can start to use docker with OMV 5

Note:

We can actually turn this method to method 2 later, if we want, we can simply Add a shared folder then select the “/docker” to be the path. (Make sure the Permissions is set correctly, otherwise docker will have error or there will be no security at all for all docker data)

3 Method 2 – Shared folder

With this method, we can easily inspect docker storage.

Warning: This method is not suggested unless you know what you are doing or it’s for testing only or you absolutely do no care about security.

3.1 Navigate to”Access Rights Management – Shared Folders”

OMV - Access Rights Manager - Shared Folders
OMV – Access Rights Manager – Shared Folders

3.2 Click on “Add” button, fill/select necessary details to create a new shared folder

OMV Create Shared folder
OMV Create Shared folder

3.3 Use following command on terminal or via SSH to double check the folder is created

ls -ahld /srv/dev-disk-by-label-FSonRAID/*
ls command to show folders
ls command to show folders

3.4 Now go back to OMV web GUI follow step 2.2 to step 2.4 (Except this time, we need to use “/srv/dev-disk-by-label-FSonRAID/SharedFolder” for step 2.3

Once done, we now have docker storage in a shared folder, which we can easily use Windows Share/SMB to open and view docker image rather than use terminal/SSH etc.


How to: Fix “Could not get lock…” “Unable to lock directory…” in OpenMediaVault (OMV)

The Error

Sometimes when we want to install some tools/program with “sudo apt install program” in OMV via terminal/SSH we encounter following error which blocks us from installing the program

E: Could not get lock /var/cache/archives/lock – open (11: resource temporarily unavailable)
E: Unable to lock directory /var/cache/apt/archives

The Fix

Usually, that means we have new updates waiting to be installed

1 Navigate to OMV web UI via http/https://your-OMV-hostname-or-IP-address

2 Navigate to “System” click on “Update Management”

OMV - Update Management
OMV – Update Management

3 Check all available updates then click on “Install” button

4 Wait till all updates are done

5 Now get back to terminal/SSH and try to install program again, this time there should be no errors

Bonus

Here are some useful apps/programs/utilities can be installed via “sudo apt install” and can be used easily for managing/monitoring OMV from terminal/SSH

htop – Similar to top, with more info

htop
htop

nethogs – Real-time network/traffic usage

nethogs
nethogs

iftop – Another traffic monitoring program

iftop
iftop

glances – Comprehensive monitoring

glances
glances

Quick Linux File Manipulation Commands Reference (and How to: Create Symbolic link/Soft link/Hard link)

  • cd: Change directory
    • cd ~ or cd : Back to top folder
    • cd .. : Uppler level folder (../.. Uppler uppler)
  • pwd : Print working directory (Show current working directory)
  • ls : List files/folders within current folder
  • ls -l : With Detail
  • ls -a : Show all files, including hidden files (starts with dot “.”)
  • ls -lh : Show human readable size units
  • mkdir : Make directory
    • mkdir test : Create a folder named “test”
  • touch : Create file
    • touch mytext.txt : Create a text file named “mytext.file”
  • rm : Remove file, folder
    • rm -r : Remove folder and everything within that folder.
    • rm -f : Remove without confirming
    • rm -i : Confirm before removing
    • rm -rf : Remove the folder and everything within the folder without confirmation
    • rm -rf ./* : Remove everything within the current folder
  • mv : Move, Rename
    • mv file /folder1 : Move “file” under current folder to “folder1” withing current folder
    • mv filename1 filename2 : Rename from “filename1” to “filename2”
  • cp : Copy
    • cp /tmp/file ./ : Copy file under /tmp folder to current folder
    • cp -r myfolder/ folder2 : Copy everything from “myfolder” to “folder2”
  • find : Find/Search
    • find /tmp -name keyword : Search for “keyword” via name within “/tmp folder”
    • find /tmp -name ‘keyword*’ : Search for file names’ begin with “keyword” within “/tmp folder”
    • find /tmp -name ‘?keyword’ : Search for file names’ end with “keyword” within “/tmp folder”
    • find /tmp -size +3M : Search for files which is bigger than 3M
  • which : Show command path
    • which squid
  • cat : Show file content
    • cat /tmp/file : Show content within “/tmp/file”
  • more : Show content in multiple pages
    • more /etc/services
    • “Enter” key to show one more line
    • “Space” key to show one more page
    • “Q” key to exit
  • head : Show the head (top) of the file
    • head -n 10 /etc/services : Show first 10 lines of the “/etc/services” file
  • tail : Show the end of the file
    • tail -n 10 /etc/services : Show last 10 lines of “/etc/services” file
  • ln : Create link
    • ln -s SourceFile symbolicLink: Create soft link (symbolic link)
      (ln -s file link)
    • ln SourceFile hardLink: Create hard link
      (ln file link)
''' Soft link/Symbolic link '''
# When the target file is removed, the soft link is useless
# Soft links can span file systems
touch
''' Soft link/Symbolic link '''
# When the target/source file is removed, the soft link is useless
# Soft links can span file systems
 
touch 1.txt
echo 'Some text' >> 1.txt #Write 'Some text' to 1.txt file
cat 1.txt #Output content from 1.txt
(Output) 123
ln -s 1.txt 2.txt
ls -l
(Output) 2.txt -> 1.txt #Editing 2.txt will actually edit 1.txt file, size of 2.txt won't change, only the target file 1.txt will change the size.
(Output) 1.txt
 
''' Hard link '''
# Delete any target/source file, the other one will still exist
# Hard links can't span file systems
touch 1.txt
echo 'Some text' >> 1.txt
ln 1.txt 2.txt
ls -ls
(Output) 1.txt
(Output) 2.txt
echo 'test 2' >> 1.txt
echo 'test 3' >> 2.txt
cat 1.txt
(Output) Some text
(Output) test 2
(Output) test 3
cat 2.txt
(Output) Some text
(Output) test 2
(Output) test 3
# Change the target/source or the hard link file will change the other one as well. Same size, with different name.

Want to know how to find real path for symbolic links/soft links and hard links?

Follow this guide: How to: Find real path of symbolic links in Debian/Ubuntu etc.


How To: Create Apple Time Machine in Open Media Vault 5 (OMV 5) with Shared Folder (SMB Share/Windows Share/Shared Folder/CIFS)

In How To: Create Apple Time Machine in Open Media Vault (OMV) we have walked-through how to create Apple Time Machine in OMV 4 with openmediavault-netatalk plugin. It’s compatible with many older and newer macOS, but it’s not possible to see or share files using that space with Microsoft Windows Operating Systems like Windows 10 etc.

From macOS Mojave 10.14 and onwards (Including macOS Catalina 10.15), Time Machine is compatible with Windows Share/Shared Folder/SMB/CIFS. (Suggested minimum SMB version V3)

This guide will not only walk you through how to create apple time machine in open media vault 5 (OMV 5) with Shared Folder/SMB Share/Windows Share/CIFS, you will also learn how to create Windows shared folder for use between Windows PC<-> Windows PC, Windows PC <-> macOS, macOS <-> macOS in OMV 5.

(For OpenMediaVault 4/OMV 4, please follow this one: How To: Create SMB/CIFs/Windows Share in Open Media Vault (OMV))

1 Make sure OMV 5 Installed

1.1 Login to OMV webui

1.2 Go to “Diagnostics” -> “System Information”

OMV -> Diagnostics -> System Information
OMV -> Diagnostics -> System Information

1.3 Make sure you have OMV 5 installed

OMV - Version - 5.2.1-1 (Usul)
OMV – Version – 5.2.1-1 (Usul)

2 Create File system

2.1 Make sure you have attached the physical disk to the device

2.2 Login to open media vault webui

2.3 Go to “Storage” -> “Disks”

OMV -> Storage -> Disks
OMV -> Storage -> Disks

2.4 Scan for disks if it’s not there

OMV -> Storage -> Disks -> Scan
OMV -> Storage -> Disks -> Scan

2.5 Go to “Storage” -> “File Systems”

OMV -> Storage -> File Systems
OMV -> Storage -> File Systems

2.6 Click on “Create” button to create and initialise the disk for use

OMV-> Storage -> File Systems
OMV-> Storage -> File Systems

2.7 Create file system, make sure you have selected correct “Device”, you can leave the “Label” empty, select default “EXT4” as “File system” if you have no idea what is this or which one to go with.

OMV-> Storage -> File Systems -> Create file system
OMV-> Storage -> File Systems -> Create file system

2.8 Now the new File system is created, we need to Mount it (Attach it for use). Select the File system we have just created, then click on Mount button

OMV-> Storage -> File Systems -> Mount
OMV-> Storage -> File Systems -> Mount

2.9 Click on “Apply” to commit the change

The configuration has been changed. You must apply the changes in order for them to take effect.
The configuration has been changed. You must apply the changes in order for them to take effect.

3 Create Windows Share (SMB Share/Shared Folder/CIFS) For Time Machine (and Windows) to use/share

3.1 Go to “Services” -> “SMB/CIFS”

OMV -> Services -> SMB/CIFS
OMV -> Services -> SMB/CIFS

3.2 Click on “Shares” then click on “Add”

OMV - Services -> SMB/CIFS -> Shares -> Add
OMV – Services -> SMB/CIFS -> Shares -> Add

3.3 Click on “+” button from “Shared folder” row

OMV -> Services -> SMB/CIFS -> Shares -> Add -> Add Share
OMV -> Services -> SMB/CIFS -> Shares -> Add -> Add Share

3.4 Give it a name, select correct device, create a path leave the permission as default, Click on “Save” button to save the settings

OMV -> Services -> SMB/CIFS ->Shares -> Add -> Add Share ->Add shared folder
OMV -> Services -> SMB/CIFS ->Shares -> Add -> Add Share ->Add shared folder

3.5 Make sure “Shared folder” row has right settings, Make sure “Time Machine support” is enabled, Click on “Save” button to save the settings

OMV -> Services -> SMB/CIFS -> Shares -> Add -> Add Share
OMV -> Services -> SMB/CIFS -> Shares -> Add -> Add Share
OMV -> Services -> SMB/CIFS -> Shares -> Add -> Add Share
OMV -> Services -> SMB/CIFS -> Shares -> Add -> Add Share

3.6 Click on Settings, enable SMB/CIFS service

OMV -> Services -> SMB/CIFS -> Settings -> Enable
OMV -> Services -> SMB/CIFS -> Settings -> Enable

3.7 Now you will be able to find the Time Machine folder from your “macOS” -> Top Left corner “Apple Icon” -> “System Preferences” -> “Time Machine” -> “Select Backup Disk…” (Warning: It’s a good idea to continue with Section 4 to create and use a dedicate account for accessing shared folder rather than using OMV’s administrator account for security reasons though it’s not essential for making shared folder and Time Machine working)

macOS -> Apple Icon -> System Preferences...
macOS -> Apple Icon -> System Preferences…
macOS -> Apple Icon -> System Preferences... -> Time Machine
macOS -> Apple Icon -> System Preferences… -> Time Machine
macOS -> Apple Icon -> System Preferences... -> Time Machine -》 Select Backup Disk...
macOS -> Apple Icon -> System Preferences… -> Time Machine -》 Select Backup Disk…

4 Create and configure Users if necessary

4.1 Go to “Access Rights Management” -> “User”

OMV -> Access Rights Management -> User
OMV -> Access Rights Management -> User

4.2 Click on “Add” -> “Add”

OMV -> Access Rights Management -> User -> Add -> Add
OMV -> Access Rights Management -> User -> Add -> Add

4.3 Enter Name, Password for the new user under “General” tab, make sure the user is in “users” group under “Group” tab

OMV -> Access Rights Management -> User -> Add -> Add -> Add user - General
OMV -> Access Rights Management -> User -> Add -> Add -> Add user – General
OMV -> Access Rights Management -> User -> Add -> Add -> Add user - Group
OMV -> Access Rights Management -> User -> Add -> Add -> Add user – Group

4.3 Now you should be able to see the new user in the list

OMV -> Access Rights Management -> User
OMV -> Access Rights Management -> User

5 Configure user permission for shared folder

5.1 Go to “Access Rights Management” -> “Shared Folders”

OMV -> Access Rights Management -> Shared Folders
OMV -> Access Rights Management -> Shared Folders

5.2 Click on the shared folder which we have configured in Section 3, then click on “Privileges” button, make sure give “Read/Write” access to the user we have created

OMV -> Access Rights Management -> Shared Folders
OMV -> Access Rights Management -> Shared Folders

6 Configure Time Machine on macOS

6.1 On macOS, go to Top Left corner “Apple Icon” -> “System Preferences” -> “Time Machine” -> “Select Backup Disk…”

macOS -> Apple Icon -> System Preferences...
macOS -> Apple Icon -> System Preferences…
macOS -> Apple Icon -> System Preferences... -> Time Machine
macOS -> Apple Icon -> System Preferences… -> Time Machine
macOS -> Apple Icon -> System Preferences... -> Time Machine -》 Select Backup Disk...
macOS -> Apple Icon -> System Preferences… -> Time Machine -》 Select Backup Disk…

6.2 Select the one we have just created under “Available Disks”, click on “Use Disk” button, it will start to backup automatically. If you want secure the backup, make sure check the “Encrypt backups” before click on “Use Disk”

macOS Catalina -> Time Machine - Available Disks
macOS Catalina -> Time Machine – Available Disks

6.3 If you do not like automatic backup, just uncheck “Back Up Automatically” (Check “Show Time Machine in menu bar”, it will make your manual backup easier, the time machine icon will appear at the top of the screen (Menu bar) and access able for you to manually backup)

macOS Catalina -> Time Machine
macOS Catalina -> Time Machine

Extra: 7 Configure disk quota (Limit Time Machine size in shared folder)

7.1 In OMV, go to “Storage” -> “File Systems”, click on the Filesystem which we have just created, click on “Quota”, set an appropriate size limit for the user we have just created for Time Machine purpose and click on “Save” button

OMV - Configure quota for user
OMV – Configure quota for user

Note: This will not only limit Time Machine backup size, it actually limits the usable size for the user/account on this filesystem which means, including time machine and windows share as well. If you only want to limit time machine size, use that account only for time machine purpose, then create another account for windows share or other purpose of file sharing.

Extra: 8 Microsoft Windows access the shared folder

8.1 Open File Explorer/This PC from Windows and enter the IP address of OMV or host name of it e.g. o-test.mynetwork then Press Enter key

Microsoft Windows 10 - This PC/File Explorer
Microsoft Windows 10 – This PC/File Explorer

8.2 Enter your credential details then click on “OK” button

Microsoft Windows 10 - Login Window
Microsoft Windows 10 – Login Window

8.3 Now you will see the shared folder which we have created

Shared folder - tm
Shared folder – tm

8.4 Double click to open the shared folder, If you have already initialized Time Machine backup, you will be able to see a folder named “YourMacName.backupbundle”

Shared folder - tm - Time Machine backup
Shared folder – tm – Time Machine backup

(You won’t be able to see normal file structures e.g. your photo or document on your macOS’ desktop (Since it’s just for demo purpose I did not opt-in for encrypt backup option and that’s what you will see if the time machine backup is not encrypted ))

Shared folder - tm - Time Machine backup Folder
Shared folder – tm – Time Machine backup Folder
Shared folder - tm - Time Machine backup Folder - bands folder
Shared folder – tm – Time Machine backup Folder – bands folder
Shared folder - tm - Time Machine backup Folder - mapped folder
Shared folder – tm – Time Machine backup Folder – mapped folder
Shared folder - tm - Time Machine backup Folder Peoperties
Shared folder – tm – Time Machine backup Folder Peoperties

8.5 You can also create and modify folders and files in the shared folder from Windows PC

Creating a New folder from Windows 10 PC in shared folder
Creating a New folder from Windows 10 PC in shared folder
Creating a New test document from Windows 10 PC in shared folder
Creating a New test document from Windows 10 PC in shared folder

(Note: I strongly suggest to use this shared folder only for time machine, to protect the backup files from mistakes like accidental deletion/rename etc. You can follow Section 3 and Section 4 again to create an dedicate shared folder for macOS and Windows PC to share files rather than for Time Machine to backup files and the system, the only difference will be leave the “Time Machine support” option disabled at Step 3.5)

Other resources:

OpenMediaVault official website: https://www.openmediavault.org

OpenMediaVault official Download page: https://www.openmediavault.org/download.html

OpenMediaVault official SourceForge download repository: https://sourceforge.net/projects/openmediavault/files